RESEARCH STUDENTS

We have a diverse and dynamic group of researchers, working across a wide range of topics. We also maintain close working links with many of our graduates after they've left York. Here you'll find details of some of their projects and interests, past and present.

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DR. HARRIET EVANS TANG

Administrator, Centre for Medieval Studies

Experienced, trustworthy, fun. These are just a few of the ways coworkers describe this invaluable member of our team. Dr. Carol Adams is truly a joy to be around and makes it a pleasure to come to work every single day.

ALEXANDRA IBBOTT

Phd

Alexandra's thesis explores the socio-cultural implications of colour in the Viking Age. It is is a multi-disciplinary study involving literary, historical, and archaeological sources. Her previous research has focused on women in the Viking Age, including a cross-genre analysis of the sources describing Gunnhildr, Queen of Norway, Orkney, and York.

DR ALISON LEONARD

Lab Manager

Ralph Walters has a mind teeming with innovative ideas and outside-the-box solutions. They haven’t been a part of the team for very long, but have already made their value to the lab very apparent.

 

Research Students

  • Our family of professional researchers bring their experience and acumen together to manage the challenges and projects we take on. We’re always pushing ourselves and each other to try new things and think outside the box. Get to know the people of the Viking Studies Research Group — an unbelievable source of information and inspiration.

ALICIA MADALENA

PhD Student and Meetings co-ordinator

Experienced, trustworthy, fun. These are just a few of the ways coworkers describe this invaluable member of our team. Dr. Carol Adams is truly a joy to be around and makes it a pleasure to come to work every single day.

REBECCA DRAKE

PhD student

rebecca's research focuses on representations of the sea, and of living with the sea, in romance literature of England and Iceland, c.1250-1500. She is interested in cross-cultural connections in medieval Europe, and in rethinking the way medieval texts are thought about in relation to one another, particularly in terms of internationality.

SUZIE KIM

Post-Doc

It didn’t take long for Suzie Kim to make a big impact as our new Post-Doc. Professionalism to a tee and never without a smile, Suzie Kim is more than an asset to the Viking Studies Research Group.

 

RESEARCH STUDENTS

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MARIANA MUNOZ RODRIGUEZ

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Early Stage Researcher

Mariana is employed as a researcher on the ArchSci2020 project. Her doctoral research focuses on the proteomic analysis of worked bone artefacts from the Viking Age, with antler combs as the central objects of investigation. Previous research has focused on the horse in the Viking Age.

GRETA PEPPER

PhD student

Greta's work is influenced by  archaeology, craft history, and the natural world. Her thesis is a study of theuse and provenancing of silks in the medieval world.

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DR TIM ROWBOTHAM

PhD alumnus

Tim's research is on the literary development of the medieval Icelandic fornaldarsögur, legendary sagas composed in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries.  His PhD was funded by the Danish National Research Fund, through the Centre for Medieval Literature at the University of York and University of Southern Denmark, and affiliated with the AHRC White Rose College of Arts and Humanities.

 

RESEARCH STUDENTS

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DR NELA SCHOLMA-MASON

PhD Alumna

Nela's doctoral thesis explored the representation of ancient sites in Orkney folklore, and what this might tell us about past responses to an even earlier past.

 Her research combines approaches from folkloristics, archaeology, life-writing and history to shed light onto the past from various angles. 

DR MEGAN VON ACKERMANN

PhD Alumna

Megan's thesis focused on early medieval locks and keys as socially active and agentive objects in both England and Scandinavia.  Recognising their complexity in manufacture, in use, and in burial contexts allows us to  explore how these objects may have been used to help navigate and control the relationship between the worlds of the living and of the dead.

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ROB WEBLEY

Research Student

Following a period working in various capacities for the Portable Antiquities Scheme, Rob has been working on an AHRC collaborative doctoral project, characterising 10th- to 12th-century metalwork in England.